Lingon now on the Mac App store

If you’re a user of Lingon to generate your launchd plist files you can now find it on the Mac App store (US$4.99), where presumably it’s now being more regularly maintained than it has been recently (it was crashing for me…)

Alternatively there’s now a web based “OS X launchd property list generator”

Free sound ripping on your Mac

If you want to record sound that’s coming out your Mac’s speakers (audio channel), but are too cheap to shell out for a copy of Ambrosia’s Audio Hijack Pro or WireTap Studio, you can try installing the free SoundFlower, setting it as the audio destination in your Sound System Preferences pane, then recording from it using the free Audacity.

Disk Image preference pane

If you look in

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/DiskImages.framework/Versions/A/Resources/

you will find a DiskImages.prefPane, which when you double click it will load it as a preference pane offering pre- and post-processing and encryption options for disk images.

Disk Image Preference Pane
Disk Image Preference Pane

Of course, as it’s in a Private Framework, you get what you deserve if you use it.

Mac OS X Server AFP high CPU load problem

This discussion thread over on Apple’s forums documents a large number of system administrators who have their AFP (Apple File Protocol) creating a high CPU load and thus making the server unusable for their users.

Suggested workarounds which have anecdotally provided varied success (including none 🙁 ) include:

  • Turning off Spotlight on client machines
  • Turning off Spotlight indexing on the shared volumes
  • Executing

    defaults write /Library/Preferences/com.apple.AppleShareClient -dict-add afp_wan_threshold -int 1000
    defaults write /Library/Preferences/com.apple.AppleShareClient -dict-add afp_wan_quantum -int 131702

    on all 10.5.x client Macs.

  • Installing Security Update 2009-001 which states

    Description: A race condition in AFP Server may lead to an infinite loop. Enumerating files on an AFP server may lead to a denial of service. This update addresses the issue through improved file enumeration logic. This issue only affects systems running Mac OS X v10.5.6.

The problem was originally posted with respect to Mac OS X 10.5.4 on 29th of August 2008, and still seems unresolved for many people. And people wonder why it’s hard to argue that Mac OS X Server belongs in the data centre.

Free Mac First Person Shooters

From the Wikipedia entry via Slashdot discussion:

Apple censoring iPhone Apps that don’t use private APIs

So Landon Fuller wrote his own CoverFlow implementation for his iPhone App “Peeps”, and did such a good job of it that Apple refused to allow it on the iPhone store because they claimed it was accessing the Apple’s private CoverFlow APIs. I would have thought they had methods to check the executable code, rather than just looking at the app?