Repair extension program for MacBook Pros

Apple have announced a repair extension program for the following MacBook Pro models to fix video issues:

  • MacBook Pro (15-inch Early 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)
  • MacBook Pro (17-inch Early 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (17-inch Late 2011)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15 inch, Early 2013)

The program starts in Australia and most of the world on 27th of February, but is being tested on Americans and and Canadians from the 20th.

Issues addressed include

  • Distorted or scrambled video on the computer screen
  • No video on the computer screen (or external display) even though the computer is on
  • Computer restarts unexpectedly

You can enter your Mac’s serial number here to check your model, purchase date and warranty coverage.

Lingon now on the Mac App store

If you’re a user of Lingon to generate your launchd plist files you can now find it on the Mac App store (US$4.99), where presumably it’s now being more regularly maintained than it has been recently (it was crashing for me…)

Alternatively there’s now a web based “OS X launchd property list generator”

Mac OS X Java Apps I use

Having thought about what I actually use Java for on Mac OS X (now that Apple’s indicated it’s deprecated). Probably the main ones are

  • Eclipse (Free development environment for many languages, not just Java)
  • NeoOffice/OpenOffice (Free alternatives to Microsoft Office)
  • GanttProject, a free Gantt charting and project management app
  • FreeMind, a free mind mapping application

I guess I’ll just have to fire up Java under Windows in Parallels? I guess if I’m happy to give Google all my information I could replace my use of NeoOffice with Google Docs.

Apple deprecates Java on Mac OS X

Apple’s recently released Java for Mac OS X Update 3 includes the following information in the developer release notes:

As of the release of Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 3, the version of Java that is ported by Apple, and that ships with Mac OS X, is deprecated.

This means that the Apple-produced runtime will not be maintained at the same level, and may be removed from future versions of Mac OS X. The Java runtime shipping in Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, and Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, will continue to be supported and maintained through the standard support cycles of those products.

So, either Steve’s had a chat with Larry and Oracle’s going to be doing the Java build for Apple, or Apple isn’t going to have Java apps running on Mac OS X, which is going to add to the pain for educational institutions, and developers who want to write cross platform code more easily (although these days many would argue that this is possible with Javascript and HTML5 no doubt). No doubt it’s also that Java apps don’t look and feel so much like Mac Apps, which seems to be one of Steve’s reasons for ditching Flash.